Little Mai Sunshine: You Can't Sit With Us
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Wednesday, September 9, 2015

You Can't Sit With Us






Part 2 of the Back To School collaboration with blogger bae, Lynn Do of Neckbreakin' Style. This time, we channeled our inner Regina George and conveyed the Mean Girls of pretend New York high school stereotypes. 

Playing up this character for this photoshoot was super fun and hilarious because I never imagined I could be that kind of girl. High school wasn't exactly set up the way movies and books portrayed them to be. At least not for me. I went to a small all-girls Catholic school in a Jersey town about 20 minutes away. It was my third move so naturally I was the social outcast, which didn't exactly bother me since I saw it as a chance to start over and create a new image for myself but it still wasn't easy being the "new girl". In fact, it made me quite the floater--never particularly belonged to a group but still part of every group. At first, I enjoyed the advantage of knowing people in each clique, a sense of popularity in itself, but soon after, I quickly realized that because of this nomad social life, no one felt obligated to fully include me in plans or hangouts or group chats, etc. It was lonely and disappointing. I missed out on the typical high school experience--I wasn't a "popular girl", an "athlete", a "nerd", etc. And it wasn't the label I coveted, but the idea of walking into the cafeteria and heading straight to the table where you belong. 

Fast forward to 7 years later and I'm still quite the floater. Except the difference now is that I actually don't mind. I spent those several years post-high school searching for a better sense of who I am and in doing so, I acquired friends perfectly accommodating for the lifestyle I lead and it's the best support system I could ask for. Through the years, I've learned that I'm not one to rely on just one group of friends because I am so involved in various commitments that I've gained close friends in all areas. And now looking back, I'm glad I didn't conform to the high school stereotypes. It may have been a struggle to float around, but it resulted in a greater sense of fulfillment later on. 

Photography by Erika Dickstein


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Wednesday, September 9, 2015

You Can't Sit With Us






Part 2 of the Back To School collaboration with blogger bae, Lynn Do of Neckbreakin' Style. This time, we channeled our inner Regina George and conveyed the Mean Girls of pretend New York high school stereotypes. 

Playing up this character for this photoshoot was super fun and hilarious because I never imagined I could be that kind of girl. High school wasn't exactly set up the way movies and books portrayed them to be. At least not for me. I went to a small all-girls Catholic school in a Jersey town about 20 minutes away. It was my third move so naturally I was the social outcast, which didn't exactly bother me since I saw it as a chance to start over and create a new image for myself but it still wasn't easy being the "new girl". In fact, it made me quite the floater--never particularly belonged to a group but still part of every group. At first, I enjoyed the advantage of knowing people in each clique, a sense of popularity in itself, but soon after, I quickly realized that because of this nomad social life, no one felt obligated to fully include me in plans or hangouts or group chats, etc. It was lonely and disappointing. I missed out on the typical high school experience--I wasn't a "popular girl", an "athlete", a "nerd", etc. And it wasn't the label I coveted, but the idea of walking into the cafeteria and heading straight to the table where you belong. 

Fast forward to 7 years later and I'm still quite the floater. Except the difference now is that I actually don't mind. I spent those several years post-high school searching for a better sense of who I am and in doing so, I acquired friends perfectly accommodating for the lifestyle I lead and it's the best support system I could ask for. Through the years, I've learned that I'm not one to rely on just one group of friends because I am so involved in various commitments that I've gained close friends in all areas. And now looking back, I'm glad I didn't conform to the high school stereotypes. It may have been a struggle to float around, but it resulted in a greater sense of fulfillment later on. 

Photography by Erika Dickstein


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