Little Mai Sunshine: Unfurl Your Leaves
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Thursday, October 8, 2015

Unfurl Your Leaves


"I really want to fight for a patch of heaven and earth that stretches its branches and unfurls its leaves, this nourishment from heaven and earth would heal your pain. I want to grow stronger."




Thrifted trench // Zara top // Swell pants

What is "crazy" if it's not an extension of our fiercest personality, intense emotions, or perceptual differences? A societal interpretation for the norm's opposite but a loose translation for the unusual behavior. And if it's not thrown around like a dirty rag of derogatory meaning, then is crazy just another dimension of our never-ending maze of a mind? 

But I wasn't raised that way. I was taught that the word "crazy" only existed in angry environments habited by hurtful intentions. I grew up believing that if my logic didn't align with others', then only someone "crazy" would breed the thoughts as absurd as I claimed. The black and white idea of "crazy" became a mental curse engrained in my young, naive mind. Ever since then, anything remotely considered different from the majority was automatically shelved back into its hidden place, never to be publicly announced again. But it has been an epic burden, a looming weighted presence consuming my very cognition. I feel contained in a mental box and has led to many internal breakdowns. Little by little, my actions are determined by the appropriateness of "crazy". 

It all comes down to what defines the term itself and by whom. We are conditioned to create an overthought and distorted truth for ourselves when in reality, it is an over exaggeration. What I deem "crazy" will not coincide with what someone else characterizes the word. And even then, the word itself doesn't have to be negative in its judgment, but simply a beautiful depth of character that creates palpable substance. 

My goal is to free myself from this mental burden and absorb craziness as an elaborate journey to embark and conquer instead of treating it as a psychological disorder to lock away.


Photography by Rexon Arquiza

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Thursday, October 8, 2015

Unfurl Your Leaves


"I really want to fight for a patch of heaven and earth that stretches its branches and unfurls its leaves, this nourishment from heaven and earth would heal your pain. I want to grow stronger."




Thrifted trench // Zara top // Swell pants

What is "crazy" if it's not an extension of our fiercest personality, intense emotions, or perceptual differences? A societal interpretation for the norm's opposite but a loose translation for the unusual behavior. And if it's not thrown around like a dirty rag of derogatory meaning, then is crazy just another dimension of our never-ending maze of a mind? 

But I wasn't raised that way. I was taught that the word "crazy" only existed in angry environments habited by hurtful intentions. I grew up believing that if my logic didn't align with others', then only someone "crazy" would breed the thoughts as absurd as I claimed. The black and white idea of "crazy" became a mental curse engrained in my young, naive mind. Ever since then, anything remotely considered different from the majority was automatically shelved back into its hidden place, never to be publicly announced again. But it has been an epic burden, a looming weighted presence consuming my very cognition. I feel contained in a mental box and has led to many internal breakdowns. Little by little, my actions are determined by the appropriateness of "crazy". 

It all comes down to what defines the term itself and by whom. We are conditioned to create an overthought and distorted truth for ourselves when in reality, it is an over exaggeration. What I deem "crazy" will not coincide with what someone else characterizes the word. And even then, the word itself doesn't have to be negative in its judgment, but simply a beautiful depth of character that creates palpable substance. 

My goal is to free myself from this mental burden and absorb craziness as an elaborate journey to embark and conquer instead of treating it as a psychological disorder to lock away.


Photography by Rexon Arquiza

Post a Comment